Publications

Complications in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: Management of Hemostasis and Bleeding Disorders in Surgical Procedures Jay P. Malmquist DMD

Hemostasis of oral surgery wounds with the HemCon Dental Dressing.

Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery : the official journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons
May 19 2008
Authors: Malmquist JP, Clemens SC, Oien HJ, Wilson SL.

Abstract: Hemostasis of oral surgery wounds with the HemCon Dental Dressing. 2008-05-19 Abbreviation: J. Oral Maxillofac. Surg. Journal: Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery : official journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons Malmquist JP, Clemens SC, Oien HJ, Wilson SL.

PURPOSE: This study evaluated the efficacy of the HemCon Dental Dressing (HDD; HemCon Medical Technologies, Inc, Beaverton, OR) hemostatic oral wound dressing derived from the US military HemCon Bandage combat wound dressing and whether early hemostasis affects postoperative care and surgical healing outcomes following oral surgical procedures.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: All patients aged 18 to 90, except those allergic to seafood, who consented to participate were eligible for enrollment into this study regardless of other medical history findings. All patients were required to have 2 or more surgical sites so they would have internal surgical control sites. All patients taking oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) were included for treatment in this study without altering their anticoagulant medication regimens. All data were evaluated by biomedical statisticians and Institutional Review Board approval was obtained.

RESULTS: All HDD surgically treated sites, including all from patients taking OAT, achieved hemostasis in less than 1 minute and control wounds in 9.53 minutes (P < .001).=”” all=”” hdd=”” sites=”” achieved=”” hemostasis=”” sooner=”” than=”” control=”” sites=”” (p=””><.001). approximately=”” 32%=”” of=”” hdd=”” treated=”” sites=”” had=”” significantly=”” better=”” healing=”” compared=”” with=”” control=”” sites=”” (p=””><.020) and=”” no=”” control=”” sites=”” healed=”” better=”” than=”” hdd=”” treated=”” sites;=”” 32%=”” of=”” hdd=”” treated=”” oral=”” surgery=”” wounds=”” achieved=”” statistically=”” significant=”” improved=”” healing=”” (p=””><.001). all=”” patients=”” taking=”” oat=”” achieved=”” hemostasis=”” within=”” 1=”” minute=”” and=”” were=”” treated=”” without=”” altering=”” their=”” anticoagulant=”” regimens.=”” although=”” the=”” pain=”” scores=”” and=”” incidence=”” of=”” alveolar=”” osteitis=”” were=”” lower=”” for=”” the=”” hdd-treated=”” sites,=”” these=”” scores=”” were=”” not=”” significantly=”” different=”” than=”” control-treated=”” sites.=”” there=”” was=”” no=”” negative=”” healing=”” sequela=”” associated=”” with=”” early=”” hemostasis=”” of=”” oral=”” surgical=”” wounds.=””>

CONCLUSION: The HDD has been proven to be a clinically effective hemostatic device that significantly shortens bleeding time following oral surgery procedures for all patients, including those patients taking OAT. Patients receiving the HDD had improved surgical wound healing compared with those receiving controls.